Vine, owned by Twitter, has made significant changes in rules to avoid being the source of explicit sensitive content.

When released in January 2013, Vine was received well as an app that allows anybody to create and share video clips of six-second duration. However shortly after its release and before anyone could understand or react, it also turned into a space full of explicit sensuous or sensational content. Now, Twitter has clamped down on the sensitive content on Vine.

When Vine had initially infected porno, the initial response was to render the sexually explicit videos difficult to search. There were warnings flashed to the users and stressed that users should view the explicit content only if they are above 18 years of age. The age bar for users of the app was elevated to 17+ from a meager 12 in Apple’s AppStore.

However now in absolute terms, the subtle or delicate content has been squarely banned. Users who have been associated with such content have received notifications to the effect that they are supposed to remove such content and follow the new rules. In any case, the users don’t comply with the rules; their accounts would be suspended.  For those who find such explicit content anywhere can report about it by using ‘report this post’.

The major 5 instances of what has been termed as sexually explicit content to be banned under the new rules. On the other hand, Twitter isn’t completely against nudity and it isn’t a blanket ban on nudity.

It has also been made amply clear that those who violate these rules would face the suspension of accounts. Their accounts would be restored only after the removal of the objectionable content and assurance that their accounts do and would in future as well comply with these rules. Users in question would get, at the most, one week to bring their house in order or run the risk of account suspension.

However, there would be a provision for appeal and due process in case of controversial accounts. Else, the users who have created a lot of their creative content at times lose their content due to the automated processes as the one on Yahoo’s Flickr, after ‘report content’ function comes into play. Although Twitter maintained that accounts under question would undergo review by specially trained teams with expertise for ‘consistency’.

1 COMMENT

  1. Do people have a right to post naked pictures on their own phone. If u pay 6 hundred dollars for a phone. Nobody can’t tell u not to take nude pictures.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.