YouTube has introduced 4K (Ultra HD) Videos, at least on an experimental level, but the videos, which move at 60fps, aren’t the best for the day-to-day laptop, experts say.

YouTube is once again experimenting with, and pushing 4K videos on their platform. While 4K was originally introduced earlier this year, in February, the company now has added a short playlists of videos which feature 4K quality, along with running them at 60fps. It’s exciting for users who have a device that can handle that, but really, most laptops – and even most smartphones – will fall short in the technical requirements to actually make this happen.

Even then, many are using words like “crushed” to describe PC’s that are subjected to running these insanely high-end videos, as they ultimately create a ton of lag time, and have come out buggy for many users whose Internet connection simply cannot handle it. That being said though, this could be a point of pivot for the Internet and video streaming world as a whole.

More platforms, companies, and streaming services are looking for ways to improve quality and manufacturers are working with them on that front. In all, it’s really come down to the hardware industry catching up. The big problem that a lot of users are experiencing with the whole 4K, 60fps combination is the fact that few systems can handle both. Many systems can handle one or the other, but it doesn’t just take special hardware to shoot in 4K. It takes special hardware just to make 4K videos at 60fps run correctly on a laptop, or monitor.


Play at your own risk.

That being said, it is, as we said, a solid move forward. It does show just how fast the tech world is moving toward higher-definition graphics. That though isn’t the only thing that has to move forward. There is a lot of hardware out there on the market now that will become obsolete with a move like this, and it’s one that doesn’t just have to be overwhelmingly supported by manufacturers, but also with the consumer. Sales are increasing for monitors and TV’s that support 4K video. However, they haven’t moved to a point that would reflect a serious change in an industry that otherwise is very steadily sitting in the middle of traditional HD, and Ultra HD.

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